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the 17 you're yo zone nations have agreed to give an additional loan of nearly $45 billion to greece. they say the debt reduction plan is on its way. the loan will be granted as early as next week. at a meeting last month, the euro zone nation ministers agreed in principle on aid for greece after the government carried out austerity and other measures as preconditions for additional loans. at that time they suspended the final decision on loans. they said they needed to determine if greece's bond buy-back program would be effective. at thursday's meeting they endorsed the buy back plan of the depreciated bonds. they will repurchase bonds from the private sector at a third of their face value. the ministers agreed on a separate loan of nearly $20 billion for greece by thend of next march. loans to greece were suspended for the past six months. >> today's decision on the greek package will remove the clouds that are hanging over greece. >> and the greek prime minister welcomed the decision calling it a big success for greece and a big success for europe. investors are still uncertain a
unchanged at 4,583. we'll see where trading takes us throughout the rest of the day. greece is buying back bonds. it exceeds the 30 billion euro target. greece had been seeking investors willing to accept at 30 to 40% of the bond's face value. the program is designed to reduce the debt burden. analysts estimate greece will be able to shave about 20 billion euro's off its debt. this will clear the way for greece to receive a new infusion ofore th bilon eos in aid from the eu and other principal lenders. the organization of petroleum export and countries held a general meeting in vienna yesterday. representatives of the 12 oil exporters agreed to retain the current production target of 30 million barrels a day. they say supply is sufficient and prices are appropriate for the moment. prices in new york of benchmark crude futures have been relatively stable since the summer at just around $85 a barrel. this is against a background of slower economic recovery. opec expects demand for crude to rise as the dploe ball economy picks up. some analysts say opec could consider cutting output. heres a
, the you chose not to abandon them, but greece continues to have to make drastic cuts, leaving marks that are visible throughout the country, including a long one of the world's most famous routes -- along one of the world's most famous routes. ♪ >> at precisely 42,195 meters long, this is the route that has become the standard for all marathon runners. the course was inspired by a 2500-year old myth, only today it is run on asphalt along with the capital's main roads. this is the bay where it said the lenda battle took place in 490 bc. it marked the first greek victory over the persians. according to legend, the athenian warriors gathered in a phalanx formation and managed to fight off a persian invasion. then a messenger ran the 42- kilometer distance to athens with news of the victory. at the local museum, the marathon's legacy is omnipresent. more modern-day hellenistic heroes have also been demoralize here. for instance, marathon runner who won the first olympic marathon in 1896. >> exactly like the car which they gave to the winner. >> at the eight-kilometer mark, there are r
greece would have a worse depression than the great depression in the u.s. >> brown: a player in campaign politics, but what of the current debt debate? we talk with tea party ally, matt kibbe. >> warner: and as e.p.a. chief lisa jackson steps down, we assess the track record of the administration's environmental agency. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: five days and counting with plenty of tit-for- tat charges, but no agreement in sight. that, in short, summed up the state of affairs in washington today as the fiscal cliff deadline loomed, january
, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. >> we'll hock the person to buy our bread. if you believe the headlines, then we're sunk. greece downgraded deeper into junk. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.n >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: much of the world paused today to observe christmas. the day brought all the traditional rites of faith for christians and a new urgency to calls for calm in the troubled corners of the globe. thousands of the faithful greeted pope benedict xvi today at his cal bon
the region's financial authorities will monitor greece's bond buying back program. he says the finance ministers will sign off in the next round of loans t greece wn they meet again on december 13th. the ministers also talked about spain. they decided to provide up to nearly $40 billion euros. they're decision came after the bailout fund to sure up its constituti institutions. the nikkei average at 9,434. that's a loss of one-fourth of a percent. the dollar is slightly losing ground. dollar yen changing hands at 82.13 to 17. euro stands at 107.19 to 24. analysts say investors are selling the dollar following the release of u.s. manufacturing data. it was the lowest in almost three and a half years. more investors are showing interest in the weakening yen. taking a look at other markets, south korea's kospi is trading lower. let's take a look at australia. it's trading lower by almost a third of a percent. there's hope for floundering bas bas basic electronics firm sharp. the firm is expected to receive part of the that sum as early as this month. sharp is forecasting a record net loss
that the andard & poor's has upgraded greece's sovereign credit rating by six notches. the ratings agency cited the country's commitment to debt reduction and monetary injections by international lenders. s&p raised greece's credit rating on tuesday from selective default to b-minus. the new rating is still low and not suited to investment, but s&p officials say the outlook is stable. the greek government bought back sovereign bonds from commercial banks and the private sector earlier this month at prices lower than the face value. s&p officials praised the euro zone members' decision to provide greece with financial support. they say the upgrade reflects s&p's view that greece's neighbors are serious about keeping the country in the eurozone. >>> back here in japan the trade deficit came to about $11.3 billion in november, posting a red for a fifth month in a row. finance ministry officials say the figure is a record high for november. that's the third highest level since comparable records became available back in 1979. exports fell by 4.1% from a year earlier in yen terms. exports have falle
. the promise of another bail out funding for greece is keeping the market stable. let's get a check on tokyo markets. on the tokyo foreign exchange the dollar is trading in a narrow bend. that's 82.53 to 55. traders would like to confirm how the u.s. is performing. it's now back above the 107 levels. 107.05 to 10. let's take a look at stocks. japanese share prices are a little change. the nikkei trading above the 9,000 mark. 9,558 so far this morning. looks like everyone is waiting for the u.s. jobs data. let's take a look at the jobs market in the asia pacific. kospi is trading at the central bank's role has become a key focus in japan's general election. the leaders othe ruling party have expressed contrasting views on what the bank of japan can and should do. our business reporter spoke with two economists for their take on the issue. >> translator: debate had heated up ever since banks were urged to take strong action. >> translator: we will boost public spending. that's going to force new money into the market. this will have a positive effect on the economy. >> reporter: the comments h
friday its newest ipad and ipad mini will hit stores there too. >> susie: greece is one step closer to getting $57 billion in bailout loans. german lawmakers approved the deal reached earlier this week. greece agreed to measures that will drastically reduce its debt over the next seven years. european stock markets and the euro rose on the news. here on wall street, tom, a neutral day on most people here, investors here feeling anxious over the gridlock on the fiscal cliff. the last day of trading for november kind of wimped out. >> tom: yeah, not a lot of price action. lots of volume, though, to end the month, lots of trading volume, but not a lot of price movement here. let's go ahead and take a look at the market focus with the major indices this friday. the major stock indices ended essentlly changed today even with the rhetoric out of washington. the s&p 500 spent most of the session in the red after the disappointing drop in consumer spending. the index finished with a fractional gain. trading volume spiked at the end of the month. 1.2 billion shares on the big board. just und
on europe's economic crisis: standard and poor's gave greece a better grade. it got upgraded to a "b-minus" from "selective default" thanks to reassurances that greece will stay in the eurozone. on wall street, the dow rose 115 points, the nasdaq gained almost 44, and the s&p added 16. our next guest says any reasonable fiscal cliff deal is better than no eal. he's robert doll, chief equity strategist and senior portfolio manager at nuveen asset management. >> susie: hi, bob. nice to see you again. >> thanks, susie. >> susie: so investors and traders really do seem to think that a deal is coming, like our previous guest, roger altman. is this rally all about hopes for a deal or something nore fundamental? >> it is about hope for a deal. the malaise and the lack of confidence and the uncertainty has been pervasive, as you well know, susie. that has held corporations back from doing things, from spending money, and some individuals as well. as roger said a few minutes ago, if we can clear the air with some sort of fiscal cliff deal, i think that does lift the opportunity for the econom
, but the position could be up and running by march of next year. separately, finance ministers agreed to give greece its next bailout payment of $64 billion. in return, greece has agreed to reduce its debt load by buying back devalued bonds from private investors. the european court of human rights issued a landmark ruling today condemning the c.i.a.'s extraordinary renditions programs. it ruled that a german car salesman khaled el-masri was a victim of torture and abuse for four months at the hands of the c.i.a. el-masri said he was kidnapped from macedonia in 2003, interrogated and tortured at an afghan prison run by the c.i.a. and then dropped on an albanian mountainside when authorities realized he posed no threat. macedonia agreed to pay nearly $80,000 in damages. the u.s. has closed internal investigations into the el-masri case. starting today there should be one less reason to reach for the television remote. a new federal law went into effect banng brdcaste from airig commercials at volumes louder than the programming they accompany. the television industry has had one year to adopt the new
! you're playing your music like crazy and i'm listening to it in greece! what are you doing here? oh john! why aren'tou home minding the children? i at least had some business in greece! i had a father that killed every phaedra! phaedra! phaedra! >> that scene actually keeps coming to mind as i try to followhe modra in washington that has us heading for a cliff. a fiscal cliff. but are we? or is this, another myth in the making? for some insight, we turn to two seasoned observers both of whose books you'll want to as santa to leave in your stocking. bruce bartlett was an economic adviser to the supply-side icon jack kemp, and to two presidents -- ronald reagan and the first george bush. he got into hot water with his conservative cohorts when he wrote a widely quoted book critical of the second president bush. his most recent work is "the benefit and the burden: tax reform-why we need it and what it will take." yves smith is the founder and editor of the popular blog naked capitalism. after 25 years in the financial services industry, she now heads the management consulting firm auro
to western turkey, or asia minor, and greece. for the next ten years, from 50 to roughly 60, paul will concentrate all of his efforts in this region of the aegean basin. it's probably ephesus and the areas immediately around ephesus that will be his most important base of operations. ephesus was a cosmopolitan environment. the inscriptions and the statues and the artwork and the buildings all tell us that this is really a crossroads of culture and religious life throughout the mediterranean world. >> when you read jesus' parables, you immediately think of agriculture, you think of peasants, you think of landowners, you think of farming. when you read paul's letters, you think of the school, you think the philopher, you think of the orator, you think of the city. >> in paul's view, at least, the city was the natural environment, if you will, for christianity. he has a way of coming back to the same city, he has a way of visiting new cities and talking about visiting new cities, and it was cities that he was going to, not just general geographical areas. it's important to understan
and reaching as far west as spain. to the east, it encompassed egypt, turkey, greece, and palestine, where jesus was born in the jewish land of judea, then ruled by king herod. >> in judea, the king, herod, was in effect a client king. he ruled almost in place of rome. he was the... he was the voice of rome, the instrument of rome, probably "instrument of rome" is best in that, because he... he had his own independent notions certainly. >> herod the great was probably one of the greatest kings of the post-biblical period in israel, but you wouldn't want your daughter to date him. he was ambitious, brutal, extremely successful. >> and it is one of the real untold ironies of jewish history that this man, who... who's the guy you love to hate in jewish history, really, leaves the most indelible mark on the face of the land of israel. >> it appears that herod thought of jerusalem as his showpiece. he really wanted to make it a place where people would come, just as people would have gone to athens, or rome, or the great cities of the mediterranean world. >> narrator: a meticulously accurate mo
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)